Why Do Black & Brown Youth Fear & Distrust Police?

Dr. Rafael Outland, Assistant Professor in the Department of Counselor Education, published a manuscript  exploring why Black and Brown youth fear and distrust police, and to discuss implications for counselors and service providers who work with survivors of youth killings by police.

Dr. Rafael Outland, assistant professor in the Department of Counselor Education, published a manuscript titled “Why Black and Brown Youth Fear and Distrust Police: An Exploration of Youth Killed by Police in the US (2016/2017), Implications for Counselors and Service Providers.” The article was published in the Open Journal of Social Sciences.  Black and Brown youth homicides by police remain a public health epidemic. Such occurrences can contribute to these youth’s fear and distrust toward officers. The purpose of the manuscript was to provide evidence of why Black and Brown youth fear and distrust police, and to discuss implications for counselors and service providers who work with survivors of youth killings by police. Using a preexisting database, this work explored the frequency of youth killings by police in 2016/2017. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results revealed that 116 youth were killed by police. Black males were killed four times more often than Brown and White males, and White females were killed four times more often than Black females. Recommendations for government and judicial services, along with youth activists and mental health care providers, are discussed.

Outland, R. (2021) Why Black and Brown Youth Fear and Distrust Police: An Exploration of Youth Killed by Police in the US (2016/2017), Implications for Counselors and Service Providers. Open Journal of Social Sciences, 9, 222-240. doi: 10.4236/jss.2021.94017.

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