Stevie Rudak | January 16, 2024

Making a Difference for Women NOW

Keegan Beamish served as the Presidential Intern for the National Organization for Women (NOW), as part of the Washington Internship Program.

From sitting in on a historic Speaker of the House vote to standing side-by-side with prominent women in Washington DC, including Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and Congresswoman Lois Frankel, Keegan Beamish did it all as a Presidential Intern for the National Organization for Women (NOW).

“I worked directly with Christian Nunes, the President of the organization.”
Keegan Beamish

“I was offered the Presidential Intern position on the spot,” Beamish said. “I worked directly with Christian Nunes, the President of the organization.”

NOW serves as the largest organization of feminist grassroots activists in the United States dedicated to advocating for women’s rights, raising awareness about discrimination, and actively fighting for social justice.

“I really got to learn how it all functions and do a little bit of everything,” Beamish said. “I helped plan rallies and other events, conducted candidate endorsement research, engaged in graphic design for social campaigns, and crafted speeches for Nunes.”

Washington Internship Program students pictured with Senator Gillibrand

Keagan Beemish (left) and Senator Kristen Gillibrand (right) with other students from the Washington Internship Program.

While writing speeches, Beamish researched engaging topics including intimate partner violence, equal rights, marketing strategies targeted at younger audiences, and more.

“I really appreciated the opportunity to write speeches for Nunes. Within my first few weeks, Nunes was using some of the things I had written on a conference call,” Beamish said. “I made sure everything was accurate and connected it to larger global movements.”

Alongside research, Beamish had the opportunity to network at exclusive events held by leaders within Washington DC and diverse women-led organizations including Ms. Magazine’s 50th year publication, the International Day of the Girl Child at the U.S. State Department, Her Power Summit, and SUNY Day.

“One of the first events I attended was a celebration for Ms. Magazine’s 50th year publication, and I was five feet from Speaker Emerita (Nancy) Pelosi sipping Sprite,” Beamish said. “There was a moment I had with Nunes where I told her ‘I’m just so excited to be here,’ and she replied, ‘You fit in here.’”

Beamish’s double major in Communications and Women and Gender Studies, and her background leading Brockport’s first Women’s Union honed a skillset that perfectly prepared her for this role.

“Being a part of this legacy felt incredibly surreal. This isn’t where it ends.”
Keegan Beamish

“After founding Brockport’s first Women’s Union, I had a taste for organizing and representing,” Beamish said. “My feminist theory class was particularly helpful as we covered the history of NOW, its founding, and I thought, ‘Wow, I’m working here now.’”

At the start of her internship, Beamish’s goal was to work alongside inspiring female leaders that she could learn from and expand her professional network in the field.

“I came for what I wanted and got to use my personal interests along the way,” Beamish said. “Being a part of this legacy felt incredibly surreal. This isn’t where it ends.”